Faculty of Behavioural and Cultural StudiesAnthropology – Bachelor 25%

The degree programme in Anthropology centres around the comparative study of societies and cultures. The aim of the programme is to understand and be able to describe commonalities and differences in the ways in which humans live and think. 

Facts & Formalities

DegreeBachelor of Arts
Type of programmeUndergraduate
Start of programmeWinter and summer semester
Standard period of study6 semesters
Language(s) of instructionGerman and English
Fees and contributions169.25 € / Semester
Application procedureSubjects with access restriction
Application deadlinesInformation about deadlines can be obtained after you have put together a degree program.
Part-time optionYes

Course Content

The Bachelor’s degree programme in Anthropology as a 25% minor provides students with a theoretically-founded education in Anthropology. The general objective of the degree programme is an understanding of dynamic cultural and societal processes and contexts for actions, particularly from the perspective of the persons involved. In addition, the degree programme provides students with key qualifications for taking a reflective approach to globally-networked practices. In particular, students will develop the ability to critically examine apparently universal thought processes, value systems, and practices in the context of their specific cultural origins. Of particular significance in achieving this are field research and analysis of the underlying concept of culture, along with a familiarity with anthropological/ethnological, societal, and epistemological approaches.

Course Structure

The degree programme is divided into three sections:

  • Introductory
  • Intermediate I
  • Intermediate II

The introductory section (1st and 2nd semesters) will provide students with theoretical basics and an introduction to the subject matter. In addition, students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge within established research fields and through studies of particularly influential individual anthropologists or theoretical approaches to anthropology.

The Intermediate I section (3rd semester) provides instruction in regional studies and anthropological research methods, in particular, field research, and a reflective and self-critical analysis of the student’s own normative standards and learning traditions.

The lectures offered as part of the Advanced section (4th and 5th semesters) provide instruction in the basic terminologies and theories of two of the four areas of concentration within Anthropology studies at Heidelberg University and provide students with the opportunity to obtain further fundamental subject-specific knowledge.

The areas of focus are:

  • Religion – Ritual – Performance
  • Politics – Economy – Globalisation
  • Media – Aesthetics – Art
  • Society – Nature – Health

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