Faculty of PhilosophyJewish Studies – Bachelor 50%

The degree programme in Jewish Studies considers the Jewish religion, history and culture from the Antique period to the present day. Building on good language skills, the academic course covers different subdisciplines to offer students a methodical and comprehensive degree programme.

Facts & Formalities

DegreeBachelor of Arts
Type of programmeUndergraduate
Start of programmeWinter semester only
Standard period of study6 semesters
Language(s) of instructionGerman
Fees and contributions171.75 € / Semester
Application procedureSubjects with no admission restrictions
Application deadlinesInformation about deadlines can be obtained after you have put together a degree program.

Course Content

The Bachelor’s degree programme in Jewish Studies offers students a wide-ranging introduction to Jewish religion, history and culture. The degree programme explores the origins of Judaism, including religious texts and their interpretation over time, the history of the Jewish people, Jewish philosophy, art and literature, as well as numerous additional aspects of Jewish life in the present and past. Throughout the degree programme, students engage in intensive language learning. 

The degree programme qualifies graduates to pursue a Master’s degree, for example a Master’s degree in Jewish Studies at the Heidelberg College for Jewish Studies. 

The degree programme is non-denominational and does not require pre-existing specialist knowledge.

Course Structure

The degree programme is a modular programme. It includes introductory, advanced and specialist modules, which may consist in compulsory or compulsory elective lectures and courses. 

At the beginning of the academic course, students focus on improving their language proficiency (in modern Hebrew, biblical Hebrew and rabbinic Hebrew). In addition, they gain an overview of the subdisciplines of Jewish Studies, receive a practical orientation to the Jewish religion from the College rabbi, and gain basic understanding of how to conduct academic work. After two semesters of study, students sit an orientation examination. 

Building on these newly acquired language skills, students complete an advanced module which offers insight into the thematic modules, “culture and literature”, “Jewish experience” and “religion and philosophy”. 

The specialist module gives students the opportunity to develop an individual area of specialisation, although they must maintain some degree of interdisciplinarity.  

Students have the option of spending a semester abroad and will be credited for any additional study they complete. This is not, however, compulsory. 

 If Jewish Studies is chosen as a first major subject, students demonstrate their specialist subject knowledge and methodological skills via the independent completion of a Bachelor’s thesis. Students write their Bachelor’s thesis on a topic which they have chosen as an area of specialism from within the subdisciplines of Jewish studies in discussion with a lecturer from the field.