Dr. Lawrence Kim

 

Dr. Lawrence Kim

lawrence.kim@skph.uni-heidelberg.de

   

         

 

 

 

 

Education

Ph.D. Classics, Princeton University (Nov 2001)
A.B. Greek and Latin, Brown University (May 1992)

 

Professional Positions

Associate Professor of Classical Studies, Trinity University (San Antonio, TX) (2014-present)
Assistant Professor of Classical Studies, Trinity University (San Antonio, TX) (2010-2014)
Assistant Professor of Classics, The University of Texas at Austin (2002–2010)
Acting Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Washington (Seattle) ( 2000–2002)
Lecturer, Princeton University (1999–2000)

 

Research Interests

Greek Literature and Culture under the Roman Empire (The ‘Second Sophistic’)
Ancient Narrative Prose (Novel, Historiography, Biography)
Ancient Rhetoric, Literary Criticism, and Homeric Reception

 

Books

  • (2010) Homer between History and Fiction in Imperial Greek Literature. Cambridge.Winner, 2011 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit, American Philological Association

Articles

  • (forthcoming) “Homer in the Second Sophistic,” in C.-P. Manolea, ed. Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Homer: Hellenistic Age to Late Antiquity. Leiden and Boston.
  • (forthcoming) “Poetry, Extravagance, and the Invention of the ‘Archaic’ in Plutarch’s De Pythiae Oraculis,” in A. Georgiadou and K. Oikonomopolou, eds. Space, Time and Language in Plutarch’s Visions of Greek Culture. Berlin.
  • (forthcoming) “Atticism and Asianism,” in W. A. Johnson and D. S. Richter, eds. The Oxford Handbook to the Second Sophistic. Oxford.
  • (forthcoming) “The Trouble with Calasiris. Duplicity and Self-Presentation in Heliodorus and Galen,” in Marília P. Futre Pinheiro, Stephen Nimis, and Massimo Fusillo, eds. Modern Critical Theory and the Ancient Novel. Groningen.
  • (2014) “Archaizing and Classicism in the Literary Historical Thinking of Dionysius of Halicarnassus” in J. Ker and C. Pieper, eds. Valuing Antiquity in Antiquity. Leiden and Boston.
  • (2013) “Orality, Folktales, and the Cross-Cultural Transmission of Narrative,” in Tim Whitmarsh and Stuart Thomson, eds. The Romance between Greece and the East, 300-321. Cambridge.
  • (2013) “Figures of Silence in Dio Chrysostom’s First Tarsian Oration (Or. 33). Aposiopesis, Paraleipsis, and Huposiôpêsis,” Greece & Rome 60, 32-49.
  • (2010) “The Literary Heritage as Language: Atticism and the Second Sophistic,” in Egbert J. Bakker, ed. A Companion to the Ancient Greek Language, 468-82. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • (2009) “Historical Fiction, Brachylogy, and Plutarch’s Banquet of the Seven Sages,” in José Ribeiro Ferreira, Delfim Leão, Manuel Tröster, and Paula Barata Dias, eds. Symposion and Philanthropia in Plutarch, 481-95. Coimbra.
  • (2008) “Dio of Prusa: Or. 61, Chryseïs, or, Reading Homeric Silence,” Classical Quarterly 58, 601-21.
  • (2008) “Time,” in Tim Whitmarsh, ed. The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel, 145–61. Cambridge.
  • (2007) “The Portrait of Homer in Strabo’s Geography,” Classical Philology 102, 363–88.

Reviews

  • (forthcoming) Journal of Hellenic Studies. Review of K. Ni-Mheallaigh (2014) Reading Fiction with Lucian. Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality. Cambridge.
  • (2013) “A Canadian View of the Second Sophistic?” Classical Review 63 (2013), 88-90. Review of T. Schmidt and P. Fleury, eds. (2011) Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and its Times. Toronto.
  • (2011) Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2011.03.06. Review of M. Paschalis, et al., eds. (2009) Readers and Writers in the Ancient Novel. Groningen.
  • (2009) Hermathena 189 (2009) 136-40. Review of R. Hunter (2009) Critical Moments in Classical Literature. Cambridge.
  • (2003) Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2003.03.14. Review of T. Whitmarsh (2001) Greek Literature and the Roman Empire. Oxford.
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Letzte Änderung: 22.09.2015
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